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More ‘dangerous’ locust swarms on the way for Ethiopia

“Dangerous” locust swarms capable of devastating hectares of crops are forming in Ethiopia as it’s gripped by the worst infestation in a quarter of a century.
The United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) said more swarms are establishing as a new generation of laying begins.
“More swarms are forming from current breeding in Ethiopia and a new generation of laying has started in central Somalia and eastern Ethiopia,” FAO posted on Twitter.
The current situation is categorised as "dangerous" by the FAO.
The current situation is categorised as “dangerous” by the FAO. (Twitter: FAO Locust)
The FAO’s current Desert Locust Situation Report predicted the swarm could be bolstered by animals who fly in from neighbouring Yemen, in the Middle East.
The current infestation is categorised as “dangerous” by the FAO and is considered the worst extended infestation in 25 years.
Farmers and locals have been battling swarms since late 2019.

 

At the start of the year desert locusts also swarmed into Kenya by the hundreds of millions, from Somalia and Ethiopia.
A farmer's son raises his arms as he is surrounded by desert locusts while trying to chase them away from his crops, in Katitika village, Kitui county, Kenya. Locusts, COVID-19 and deadly flooding pose a "triple threat" to millions of people across East Africa, officials warned Thursday, May 21, 2020 while the World Bank announced a $500 million program for countries affected by the historic desert locust swarms. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
A farmer’s son raises his arms as he is surrounded by desert locusts while trying to chase them away from his crops, in Katitika village, Kitui county, Kenya. Locusts, COVID-19 and deadly flooding pose a “triple threat” to millions of people across East Africa, officials warned Thursday, May 21, 2020 while the World Bank announced a $500 million program for countries affected by the historic desert locust swarms. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File) (AP)
At the start of the year desert locusts also swarmed into Kenya by the hundreds of millions, from Somalia and Ethiopia, destroying farmland and threatening an already vulnerable region. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
As they continue their destructive march, the desert locusts are threatening an already vulnerable region. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis) (AP)
Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed said 420,000 hectares of land have been devastated across 240 Ethiopian districts.
Comprehensive efforts have been exerted to minimise the widespread devastation caused by desert locust in parts of Amhara, Oromia, Tigray, Afar, and Somali regional states, Mr Ahmed told state media.
A man holds a desert locust in his hand on May 21, 2020 in Samburu County, Kenya. Trillions of locusts are swarming across parts of Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia, following an earlier infestation in February. (Photo by Fredrik Lerneryd/Getty Images)
A man holds a desert locust in his hand on May 21, 2020 in Samburu County, Kenya. Trillions of locusts are swarming across parts of Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia, following an earlier infestation in February. (Photo by Fredrik Lerneryd/Getty Images) (Getty)
Desert locusts are one of the most invasive species of locusts. Adults can fly up to 150 kilometres a day and eat their own body weight, two grams, of vegetation in 24 hours.
They also have the ability to multiply rapidly.
 9News

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